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History

'Building powerful knowledge to grow confident & creative global citizens.’

History is common heritage for us all and has the power to develop true, global citizens who have a deep understanding of the changes that have shaped modern Britain, the wider world and our locality. The History curriculum at Lincoln Academy provides both windows and mirrors enabling students to disentangle the past and appreciate life today. History develops students who are fluent in historical concepts, both concrete and abstract, (which resurface in different historical eras: such as the church, monarchy, parliament, discrimination, revolution) and have an appetite for historical enquiry. Linking these ideas throughout the curriculum allows students to notice patterns of similarity and difference, build connections and appreciate change and continuity. History develops cultural literacy and young people who can make well-informed judgements and criticisms, practising source analysis, significance and interpretation. Students develop enquiring minds: not just answer questions but ask them too.  They are invited to question what is deemed as accepted narratives, finding flaws in them as well as explaining their existence. Students study History to develop cultural capital and understanding to give precedence to their own argument and critique those of others. This equips students for further study should they wish and enables participation in international debate and discussion of modern day.

Year 7

Module 1 – 3 Anglo-Saxons to the Middle Ages - “Hard work, harsh taxes, filth and danger” How accurate is this interpretation of life in the middle ages?

  • What makes a good Historian?
  • Is this a significant invention?
  • How united was England?
  • Was 1066 a turning point?
  • How important are the castle and the cathedral?
  • Was being a peasant really that bad?
  • Was life better in a monastery?
  • Who was in charge?

Module 4 – 6 The Renaissance “changed the world”.  How far do you agree with the premise of the article?

  • What is the Renaissance?
  • What was the Reformation?
  • Did England experience the Reformation?
  • Did the Elizabethans begin globalisation?
  • Was the world turned upside down? (Impact of the English civil war)
  • Did anything really change? (Black Death 1348 compared to the Plague 1665)

     

Year 8

Module 1 – 3 “The Industrial Revolution was another one of those extraordinary jumps forward in the story of civilisation” Stephen Gardiner.    Is this an accurate assessment of 1750-1900?

  • What is civilisation?
  • Why did Britain change? (Industrial and agricultural)
  • How did Britain change? (political and social)
  • The role of slavery and slave trade.

Module 4 – 6 “ The equal rights of all citizens [of the world] to health, education, work, food, security, culture, science and wellbeing… is what I wish for” How far did this wish come true?

  • Globalisation and international links
  • What experiences have minorities in the 20th Century had? (compare UK and non-UK)
  • What experiences have women had? (UK and non-UK)
  • What experiences have children had?
  • What experiences have the LGBT community had?

Year 9

Module 1 – 2 Britain and health through time – Medieval medicine

  • What are the key factors that impact of health of people?
  • What did the Medieval people think caused disease? (ideas from primary sources)
  • How did people treat victims of the Plague?
  • Where did Medieval people get these ideas about disease from (the importance of Hippocrates and Galen)
  • Evaluating medical professionals in the middle ages.
  • Did anything improve?
  • Why were monasteries healthier than towns?
  • Was Christianity or Islam the worse thing to happen to medicine?

Module 3 - Renaissance medicine - link the Renaissance movement

  • Who contributed the most to medical progress? (compare the work of Vesalius, Pare, Harvey and Hunter)
  • How was disease dealt with?
  • Compare the medical care of the Renaissance with the Middle Ages
  • How did the deal with disease?
  • to compare the Black Death and the great Plague
  • Who else made contributions at this time? (The work of Jenner and Sydenham)

Module 4 - 5   – Medicine during the industrial revolution

  • Linking key changes of the period to medicine - positive and negative
  • How important was the germ theory?
  • Was everyone convinced?
  • How did they deal with disease? (compare the medical care of the Renaissance with the Industrial Revolution)
  • Did surgery get safer?
  • Why did Public Health intervention increase? (establish links between the Government’s role and improvements in health)
  • How different was the Cholera epidemic to the Black Death?

Module 5-6 – Modern medicine

  • How did treatments improve? (medicinal discoveries of the 20th century)
  • How and why did surgery improve?
  • Have medical practitioner’s ideas returned to an earlier age?
  • How and why did Public Health develop in the 20th & 21st century?

Year 10

                Specification title: AQA History

                                 Conflict and Tension in Asia 1950 -1975

                                 Germany: Democracy and Dictatorship 1890 - 1945

Specification Link: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/history/gcse/history-8145

Year 11

Specification title: AQA History

                Norman England 1066 - 1100

Historical Environment study

Specification Link: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/history/gcse/history-8145